We Inspire Inc

To look beyond the confusion and provide a legal pathway for truly repentant offenders to integrate back into society.

WHAT WE DO

We Inspire, Inc. provide educational counseling and assistance in job preparation services to participants that are 18 and older, and or 2nd chance offenders giving them an opportunity to develop new skills for today’s job markets. Along with educational assistance, we provide transportation assistance along with clothing (on case by case basis) and ability to obtain their real high school diplomas creating a more fulfilling  pathway to a different future.

This corporation is organized exclusively for charitable purposes within the meaning of Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. We Inspire, Inc. provide support to facilitate access to services and resources that contribute to the improved economic well-being and security of economically disadvantaged individuals. Our program is designed to equip disadvantaged young people with the credentials and skills they need to secure employment with opportunities for career advancement in a variety of fields.

Mission  Statement

Nationally, the impact of repeat offenders on the juvenile justice system is profound: Almost 60% of youth return to juvenile court before they turn 18. (Synder & Sickmund, 2006) Youth leaving incarceration are often under educated and has limited vocational skills. (Bullis, Yovanoff, Mueller, & Havel, 2002). The stigma of their criminal background can restrict or even preclude them from access to opportunities for employment, housing, and even social activities, depending on their crime and the restrictions placed upon them as conditions of their parole. Also, a lack of ability to generate adequate financial resources through acceptable means often further stymies their efforts to gain independence.


ally, the impact of repeat offenders on the juvenile justice system is profound: Almost 60% of youth return to juvenile court before they turn 18. (Synder & Sickmund, 2006) Youth leaving incarceration are often under educated and has limited vocational skills. (Bullis, Yovanoff, Mueller, & Havel, 2002). The stigma of their criminal background can restrict or even preclude them from access to opportunities for employment, housing, and even social activities, depending on their crime and the restrictions placed upon them as conditions of their parole. Also, a lack of ability to generate adequate financial resources through acceptable means often further stymies their efforts to gain independence.



THE PROBLEM

Knowledge-first Empowerment Center

OUR VISION

What determines the offenders ability to re-enter society?  It is not the law, nor the well mined intentions of parents and many organizations.  It is almost entirely up to the individual himself to work toward being a member of society and show he has the ability to abide by the law.  But as an organization, it is our desire to inspire a sense of responsibility and to arrest the causes of recidivism and show a clear pathway to a life filled with the promise of a different future.

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